Batesville Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan

BATESVILLE, AR


Crafton Tull’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan for Batesville provides alternative transportation solutions for Arkansas’ oldest incorporated city, founded in 1821. The narrow streets added to the challenge of providing bicycle facilities and routes throughout the community. Extending bike-ped facilities along the White River created an east-west spine linking cyclists and pedestrians from the river to the historic downtown and along the city’s drainage network. A major north-south connection was established to connect the White River to the new aquatics and community center, Lyon College, UACCB, and sports fields north of town to provided important recreational, cultural, and economic connections.

In order to create a logical network that provides multiple opportunities for mobility across the city, the team identified the following strategies to direct its creation:

  • Re-stripe targeted city streets to accommodate bicycle lanes, reducing vehicular lane widths to 11’ to accommodate bike lanes as needed.
  • Widen roads for bicycle lanes or buffered bicycle lanes where important connections exist, but widening is needed for safety reasons, or where speeds, topography, traffic volumes, or other factors make sharrows an unsuitable option.
  • Utilize sharrows on low-volume, low-speed, narrow streets to create a secondary on-street bicycle network.
  • Create complete streets on key roads to accommodate bicycle and pedestrian facilities.
  • Continue implementing the vision of a robust off-road, multi-use trail network.
  • Create pedestrian spines by adding and/or improving existing sidewalks for pedestrian accessibility along major commercial corridors, and along streets with high pedestrian volumes.
  • Work with Independence County to properly sign rural routes that are frequently used by cyclists to increase safety and awareness.

The Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan was a community-driven process, guided by a steering committee of local leaders from the public and private sectors.  Citizen input guided the development of an alternative transportation network throughout the community as well as the prioritization of bicycle and pedestrian projects.